National Advisory Board

Dr. Richard Verdugo

Richard
Verdugo
Biography 

RICHARD R. VERDUGO is the Senior Research Scientist at the National Education Association in Washington, D. C.

Research Interests 

RICHARD R. VERDUGO is the Senior Research Scientist at the National Education Association in Washington, D. C. His areas of responsibility at the NEA are minority student achievement, English language learners, and school safety. Verdugo earned a doctorate in Sociology from the University of Southern California, where he focused his studies on racial stratification, the sociology of education, the sociology of labor markets, and statistics/methods. Dr. Verdugo has nearly 80 publications and has won many awards for his research, including awards from the American Sociological Association (ASA Minority Fellow, Sidney Spivak Dissertation Award), a Kellogg Fellow, was an IEL Fellow, and was a visiting scholar at the University of Michigan under a grant from the National Science Foundation. Most recently, Dr. Verdugo was named a Fulbright Scholar and studied the demographic challenges facing Germany. His most recent publications will be appearing in Education and Urban Society, and he is editing (and authoring two papers) a collection of papers addressing the demographic challenges facing German; the collection will be appearing in a forthcoming issue of Population Research and Policy Review.

Dr. Michael Trujillo

Michael
Trujillo
Biography 

Michael H. Trujillo, MD, MS, MPH is presently the Associate Dean and professor for the Outreach & Multicultural Affairs program of the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix.

Research Interests 

Michael H. Trujillo, MD, MS, MPH is presently the Associate Dean and professor for the Outreach & Multicultural Affairs program of the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix. That program office serves to increase the ethnic and cultural diversity of the college’s student body and faculty, and, in general, the healthcare workforce. Dr Trujillo oversees and supervises the program to interact with community organizations, create partnerships with national and local organizations, develop recruitment and retention initiatives and programs that target underrepresented students, and mentor students. In addition, the program represents and advises the College with regard to policy formulation and issues related to diversity, health disparities, and professional workforce development. Further, Dr Trujillo is engaged in the admissions activities for the College, curriculum development in areas of cultural competency and diversity, and in the interdisciplinary education and training program. Dr Trujillo also serves on the University of AZ Human Subjects Protection Program in Tucson as an Institutional Review Board (IRB) member and he is also a member of the President’s “University Committee on American Indian Affairs”. In Phoenix, he is also an Adjunct Professor and Co-Director in the new Public Health Practice MPH program for the College of Public Health. He is also an Associate Investigator at the University’s Arizona Cancer Center in Tucson. In addition, Dr Trujillo remains as a part-time consultant for the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen). He assists TGen to engage Indian communities in the development of applied community-based participatory research partnerships that will not only increase scientific understanding of the genetic basis of disease, but also lead to improvements in clinical care and treatment. In this effort, new partnerships and new alliances have developed that affect research strategies that will reduce the burden of health disparities and create new opportunities to improve health outcomes for American Indian tribes in AZ. TGen’s areas of research focus include oncology, neurogenomics and metabolic disorders. Its research combines cutting-edge technology and bioinformatics with basic science to sift through the human genome that play a role in disease development and progression. Dr Trujillo was the TGen’s Executive Director for Program Development & Community Outreach from October 2006 to October 2008. From November 2008 until June 2010, Dr Trujillo was the Health Research Director for the Inter-Tribal Council of Arizona, Inc (ITCA) in Phoenix, AZ. There, he assisted the Executive Office of ITCA in managing, coordinating the various health care initiatives, projects and grants, and extended collaboration with Federal, non-Federal, state, community and American Indian tribal organizations and programs. ITCA provides member tribes with the means for action on matters that affect them collectively or individually, to promote tribal sovereignty and to strengthen tribal governments. It provides technical assistance and training to tribal governments in program planning and development, research and data collection, resource development and management and evaluation. It facilitates participation of tribal leaders in the formulation of public and health policy at all levels. The goal of ITCA and its commitment to the member tribes is to ensure the self-determination of Indian tribal governments through their participation in the development of policies and programs which affect their lives. Dr Trujillo also holds academic appointments at the Arizona State University (ASU) in Tempe, AZ as Clinical Professor at the Center of Metabolic Biology, and as Professor of Practice at the 4 New Directions in Native Health CLE Conference ASU School of Public Affairs. Dr Trujillo continues his academic relationship with the University of Minnesota as an Adjunct Associate Professor at the School of Public Health. Dr Trujillo is also consultant for the Salt Lake City, UT VA Regional Medical Center to implement health care services, including telemedicine, in rural areas in several western states through a national VA rural clinics initiative from the VA Central Office in Washington, DC. He is also a consultant for American Indian programs of the Banner Health Care system’s Alzheimer’s Institute in Phoenix, AZ. In addition, he has continued as a part-time consultant for the Cancer Research & Treatment Center at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, NM. Until the beginning of 2010, he was also a consultant for the nationwide “Spirit of Eagles” cancer outreach program to American Indian tribes and communities at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Dr Trujillo previously served as the Director of the Indian Health Service (IHS), an agency within the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), in Rockville, MD. In March 1994, Dr Trujillo was the first Presidential appointed Director of the IHS with Senate confirmation. As Director, he was an Assistant Surgeon General/Rear Admiral (08) in the US Public Health Service (USPHS). He served two confirmed four year terms as the national IHS Director. In June 2002, he was appointed to the Office of the Surgeon General, DHHS, where he was involved in nationwide initiatives to improve the health status and disparities in health care of minority and underserved populations. In May 2003, he retired after serving 29 years as a USPHS Commissioned Corps Officer and having served in several agencies of the DHHS and Bureau of Prisons (BoP) of the Department of Justice. During his Commissioned Corps career, he served in various clinical and management positions in many locations throughout the US in both federal Departments. While serving as the Director of the IHS, Dr Trujillo led the effort that resulted in unprecedented tribal participation and collaboration in the IHS and within the DHHS. He headed an IHS budget expansion of over one billion dollars to the Agency, tribes and urban Indian programs to be over 5 billion dollars and more than 15,000 employees. He directed the Agency in developing the expansion for tribes to manage their own health care programs through the new SelfGovernance compacting process. He led the Agency’s headquarters reorganization with participation of tribal and urban Indian program leadership; and, he directed the development of a business plan for the Agency, as well as initiated numerous collaborations and partnerships with professional organizations, foundations, academic institutions and medical schools. He greatly strengthened the relationship and reputation of the IHS with Congress and with its authorizing and appropriation committees. In addition, Dr Trujillo participated in the DHHS’s international activities and was a Department representative to both the World Health Organization and the Pan American Health Organization. He fostered the Agency’s initiatives across other federal departments, and participated in numerous White House activities and initiatives for American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) and other underserved populations. He co-authored and co-directed the Department’s new tribal consultation policy and initiative with AI/AN tribes. He strengthened the IHS research initiatives with academic research institutions and medical centers and with the NIH. Dr Trujillo maintained that tribal leaders and communities must be an equal partner in any conducted research and that research programs must meet tribal approval and be culturally appropriate. Throughout his tenure, he emphasized that traditional AI/AN healing ceremonies and practices are an integral part of AI/AN health care programs. He emphasized that the IHS was “to serve” AI/AN people nationwide and that it was only a part of a larger Indian health care system, the “I-T-U” (IHS/tribal/ urban programs). He brought a new vision and “transparency” of operations to the Agency and involved tribal officials and urban Indian leaders nationwide in the Agency’s management programs and policy and budget formulation and evaluation processes.

Dr. Alejandro Portes

Alejandro
Portes
Biography 

Alejandro Portes is chair of the department of sociology at Princeton University (Princeton, NJ) as well as co-founder and director of Princeton's Center for Migration and Development.

Research Interests 

Alejandro Portes is chair of the department of sociology at Princeton University (Princeton, NJ) as well as co-founder and director of Princeton's Center for Migration and Development. In 1998, Portes became a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2001. Portes has spent his career tracking the lives of different immigrant nationalities in the United States. He has chronicled the causes and consequences of immigration to the United States, with an emphasis on informal economies, transnational communities, and ethnic enclaves.

Dr. Thomas LaVeist

Thomas
LaVeist
Biography 

Dr. LaVeist seeks to develop an orienting framework in the development of policy and interventions to address race disparities in health-related outcomes.

Research Interests 

Dr. LaVeist's research and writing has focused on three broad thematic research questions:

  1. What are the social and behavioral factors that predict the timing of various related health outcomes (e.g. access and utilization of health services, mortality, entrance into nursing home?
  2. What are the social and behavioral factors that explain race differences in health outcomes?
  3. What has been the impact of social policy on the health and quality of life of African Americans?

His work has included both qualitative and quantitative analysis. Dr. LaVeist seeks to develop an orienting framework in the development of policy and interventions to address race disparities in health-related outcomes. Specific areas of expertise include: U.S. health and social policy, the role of race in health research, social factors contributing to mortality, longevity and life expectancy, quantitative and demographic analysis and access, and utilization of health services

Dr. Mark V. Pauly

Mark
Pauly
Biography 

Mark V. Pauly currently holds the position of Bendheim Professor in the Department of Health Care Systems at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.  He is Professor of Health Care Systems, Insurance and Risk Management, and Business and Public Policy at the Wharton School and Professor of Economics in the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania.

Research Interests 

Mark V. Pauly currently holds the position of Bendheim Professor in the Department of Health Care Systems at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.  He is Professor of Health Care Systems, Insurance and Risk Management, and Business and Public Policy at the Wharton School and Professor of Economics in the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania.  He received a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Virginia.  Dr. Pauly is a former commissioner on the Physician Payment Review Commission and an active member of the Institute of Medicine.  One of the nation’s leading health economists, Dr. Pauly has made significant contributions to the fields of medical economics and health insurance.  His classic study on the economics of moral hazard was the first to point out how health insurance coverage may affect patients’ use of medical services.  Subsequent work, both theoretical and empirical, has explored the impact of conventional insurance coverage on preventive care, on outpatient care, and on prescription drug use in managed care.  In addition, he has explored the influences that determine whether insurance coverage is available and, through several cost effectiveness studies, the influence of medical care and health practices on health outcomes and cost.  His interests in health policy deal with ways to reduce the number of uninsured through tax credits for public and private insurance, and appropriate design for Medicare in a budget-constrained environment.  He is currently studying the effect of poor health on worker productivity.  Dr. Pauly is a co-editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics and an associate editor of the Journal of Risk and Uncertainty.  He has served on Institute of Medicine panels on public accountability for health insurers under Medicare and on improving the financing of vaccines.  Dr. Pauly is a former member of the advisory committee to the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality, and most recently a member of the Medicare Technical Advisory Panel.
In the area of life sciences, his research has involved methods for determining the cost-effectiveness of a range of drugs and devices, the impacts of regulation and insurer payment policy on the markets for new drugs, in the United States and in other countries, and the determinants of the financing of research and development of biological products.  He is a licensee of a technology through Penn’s Office of Technology Transfer, and the developer of new ways to measure the value to employers of improved worker health.  He supervises a Wharton course in which teams of MBA students consult with drug firms and others on business plans for new products, marketing strategies, and reimbursement negotiations with private insurers, Medicare, and Medicaid.  He has studied how physicians choose which drugs to prescribe, what determines the rate of adoption and diffusion of new technologies, and how profit seeking firms should plan their level of investment in research and development.  His research also involves improving the access to effective drugs in developing countries in Africa and Asia, the impact of AIDS on small businesses and their workers in South Africa, and the prospects for developing pharmaceutical startups in Taiwan, Singapore, and Korea.
A key question addressed by his research is how much a country should invest in science whose goal is to develop products that improve health but are likely to be sold at a high price, especially if protected by patents.  How insurers (public and private) are expected to pay for new products, and what regulations (through the FDA and Medicare) affect what profit seeking firms will find it worthwhile to do is an important area of interest.  He is also concerned with the problem of management of and incentives in teams of knowledge workers whose product is new ideas and new uses for existing projects.
Professor Pauly teaches courses in cost effectiveness analysis, health policy and regulation, and health economics.  His papers have won Article of the Year awards from the Academy for Health Services Research and the American Risk and Insurance Association. In addition, he has been the recipient of a "Distinguished Investigator" award from AcademyHealth and the John M. Eisenberg Excellence in Mentoring award from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. He also was the co-recipient (with M. Kate Bundorf of Stanford University) of the National Institute of Health Care Management Foundation's 13th annual research award. The NICHM Foundation award recognizes their paper, "Is Health Insurance Affordable for the Uninsured?" (Journal of Health Economics, July 2006), as the best research paper published in 2006.

Ms. Sarah Hicks

Sarah
Hicks
Biography 

An Alutiiq from Kodiak, Alaska, Sarah Hicks serves as the Director of the National Congress of American Indians Policy Research Center.

Research Interests 

An Alutiiq from Kodiak, Alaska, Sarah Hicks serves as the Director of the National Congress of American Indians Policy Research Center. She is also a Ph.D. candidate at the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University. Since 1998, she has worked with American Indian/Alaska Native governments and intertribal organizations to address welfare reform and human services delivery to Native citizens. In 2002, she testified before the Senate on proposed human service delivery reform in Indian Country.

Dan Hawkins

Dan
Hawkins
Biography 

Dan Hawkins has been named one of America's 1000 most influential health policy makers. He is the Vice-President for Federal, State, and Public Affairs at the National Association of Community Health Centers, Inc. (NACHC), where for the past 23 years he has provided NACHC's membership with federal and state health-related policy development, policy research, analysis, information, advocacy, and technical assistance services.

Research Interests 

Dan Hawkins has been named one of America's 1000 most influential health policy makers. He is the Vice-President for Federal, State, and Public Affairs at the National Association of Community Health Centers, Inc. (NACHC), where for the past 23 years he has provided NACHC's membership with federal and state health-related policy development, policy research, analysis, information, advocacy, and technical assistance services. During his tenure at NACHC, federal support for health centers has grown from $350 million to over $1.6 billion annually, and the number of people served by health centers has grown from 5 million to 15 million. Prior to joining NACHC, Dan served as a VISTA volunteer, Executive Director of a migrant and community health center located in south Texas, and as an assistant to HHS Secretary Joseph Califano during the Carter Administration. He has written numerous articles and monographs on health care and health center issues, currently oversees production of several NACHC publications annually, and has provided testimony before several Congressional Committees. Dan has also lectured on health policy at Harvard, Johns Hopkins, George Washington, and other universities, and has been interviewed frequently by major newspapers and radio/television networks.

Dr. Jose Escarce

Jose
Escarce
Biography 

Dr. José J. Escarce, MD, PhD, is Professor of Medicine in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Professor of Health Policy and Management in the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, and Senior Natural Scientist at RAND.

Research Interests 

UCLA Medical Center

Dr. José J. Escarce, MD, PhD, is Professor of Medicine in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Professor of Health Policy and Management in the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, and Senior Natural Scientist at RAND. Dr. Escarce has published extensively on a variety of topics including physician behavior, medical technology adoption, racial and socioeconomic differences in health care, and the effects of market forces on access, costs, and quality of care. His research interests and expertise include health economics, managed care, physician behavior, racial and ethnic disparities in medical care, and technological change in medicine. Dr. Escarce has studied racial differences in the utilization of surgical procedures and diagnostic tests by elderly Medicare beneficiaries, and was lead investigator of a study of racial differences in medical care utilization among older persons that was based on the 1987 National Medical Expenditures Survey. Recent research for an NIH conference used the 1996 - 1998 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to assess racial and ethnic differences in public and private sources of health care expenditures in the Medicare population. He was also co-investigator of a study that used interactive videodisc technology to assess the impact of patient race and gender on physician decision-making for patients with chest pain.

Dr. Escarce is currently working on several projects that address socio-demographic barriers to access in managed care organizations, and is principal investigator of a program project entitled "Health Care Markets and Vulnerable Populations," which uses the MEPS and is funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Among other issues, the program project addresses racial and ethnic differences in access to and quality of medical care. He was member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Understanding and Eliminating Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care.

Dr. Carolyn Clancy

Carolyn
Clancy
Biography 

Carolyn Clancy, M.D., was named Interim Under Secretary for Health for the Department of Veterans Affairs, on July 2, 2014.

Research Interests 

US Department of Health
Carolyn Clancy, M.D., was named Interim Under Secretary for Health for the Department of Veterans Affairs, on July 2, 2014. As Interim Under Secretary for Health, Dr. Clancy oversees the health care needs of millions of Veterans enrolled in VHA, the United States’ largest integrated health care system, with more than 1700 sites, including hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and Readjustment Counseling Centers. In addition, VHA is the nation’s largest provider of graduate medical education and a major contributor to medical research.
Prior to assuming the duties of the Interim Under Secretary for Health, Dr. Clancy was the Assistant Deputy Under Secretary for Health, for Quality, Safety and Value where served as the Chief Quality Management Officer for VHA – planning, directing, coordinating, and evaluating VHA’s national quality, safety, and value-producing programs and approaches.
Dr. Carolyn M. Clancy also served as Director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), from February, 2003 through August, 24, 2013.
Dr. Clancy, a general internist and health services researcher, is a graduate of Boston College and the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Following clinical training in internal medicine, Dr. Clancy was a Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. Before joining AHRQ in 1990, she was also an assistant professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the Medical College of Virginia.
Dr. Clancy holds an academic appointment at George Washington University School of Medicine (Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Medicine) and serves as Senior Associate Editor, Health Services Research. She serves on multiple editorial boards including JAMA, Annals of Family Medicine, American Journal of Medical Quality, and Medical Care Research and Review.
She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and was elected a Master of the American College of Physicians in 2004. In 2009, was awarded the 2009 William B. Graham Prize for Health Services Research.
Her major research interests include improving health care quality and patient safety, and reducing disparities in care associated with patients’ race, ethnicity, gender, income, and education. As Director, she launched the first annual report to the Congress on health care disparities and health care quality.
 

Dr. Daniel Carpenter

Daniel
Carpenter
Biography 

Daniel Carpenter is Allie S. Freed Professor of Government, Director of the Center for American Political Studies in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and Director of the Social Science Academic Ventures Program at the Radcliffe Institute at Harvard University.

Research Interests 

Daniel Carpenter is Allie S. Freed Professor of Government, Director of the Center for American Political Studies in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and Director of the Social Science Academic Ventures Program at the Radcliffe Institute at Harvard University. In Spring 2014 he was a visiting professor at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris, France. He graduated from Georgetown University in 1989 with distinction in Honors Government and received his doctorate in political science from the University of Chicago in 1996. He taught previously at Princeton University (1995-1998) and the University of Michigan (1998-2002). He joined the Harvard University faculty in 2002. Dr. Carpenter mixes theoretical, historical, statistical and mathematical analyses to examine the development of political institutions, particularly in the United States. He focuses upon public bureaucracies and government regulation, particularly regulation of health and financial products. His dissertation received the 1998 Harold D. Lasswell Award from the American Political Science Association and as a book - The Forging of Bureaucratic Autonomy: Reputations, Networks and Policy Innovation in Executive Agencies, 1862-1928(Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001) - was awarded the APSA's Gladys Kammerer Prize as well as the Charles Levine Prize of the International Political Science Association. His recently published book on pharmaceutical regulation in the United States is entitled Reputation and Power: Organizational Image and Pharmaceutical Regulation at the FDA (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010), and has received the 2011 Allan Sharlin Memorial Award from the Social Science History Association.

Professor Carpenter has held fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the Brookings Institution and the Santa Fe Institute. He has received grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Science Foundation, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (National Institutes of Health), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (Scholars in Health Policy 1998-2000, Investigator Award in Health Policy Research 2004-2007), the Alfred Sloan Foundation, the Russell Sage Foundation and the Safra Center for Ethics. In the past few years, Professor Carpenter is the winner of both the 2011 Herbert Simon Award of the Midwest Political Science Association for a scholar "who has made a significant career contribution to the scientific study of bureaucracy", as well as the 2011 David Collier Award of the American Political Science Association for career contributions to qualitative and multi-method research. From 2011 to 2013 he was a visiting researcher and visiting professor (part-time) at the Institut d'Études Politiques at the Université de Strasbourg in France.

In addition to his ongoing teaching and scholarship on the political economy of government regulation and health, Professor Carpenter has recently launched a long-term project on petitioning in North American political development, examining comparisons and connections to petitioning histories in Europe and India. He hopes to draw upon the millions of petitions in local, state and federal archives to create an educational, genealogical and scholarly resource for citizens, students and scholars.

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