Presenters

Hirokazu Yoshikawa

Hirokazu Yoshikawa is the Courtney Sale Ross Professor of Globalization and Education at NYU Steinhardt and a University Professor at NYU.

He is a community and developmental psychologist who studies the effects of public policies and programs related to immigration, early childhood, and poverty reduction on children’s development.

Donald J. Hernandez

Donald J. Hernandez is Professor, Department of Sociology, Hunter College and The Graduate Center, City University of New York (CUNY).  He is the author of America’s Children: Resources from Family, Government, and the Economy (Russell Sage Foundation, 1993), the first national research using children as the unit of analysis to document the timing, magnitude, and reasons for revolutionary changes experienced by children since the Great Depression in family composition, parent’s education, father’s and mother’s work, and family income and poverty.

Carola Suárez-Orozco

Professor of Education Co-Director, Institute for Immigration, Globalization, and Education Graduate School of Education & Information Studies UCLA

Teaching & Research Interests:

Ann Masten

Ann Masten Regents Professor, Irving B. Harris Professor of Child Psychology, Distinguished McKnight University Professor University of Minnesota

I study competence, risk, and resilience in development, with a focus on the processes leading to positive adaptation and outcomes in young people whose lives are threatened by adversity. This work aims to build a better science for promoting positive adaptation and preventing problems in human development.

Greg Duncan

Greg Duncan holds the title of Distinguished Professor in the School of Education at the University of California, Irvine. Duncan received his PhD in economics from the University of Michigan and spent the first 35 years of his career at the University of Michigan and Northwestern University. Duncan’s recent work has focused on estimating the role of school-entry skills and behaviors on later school achievement and attainment and the effects of increasing income inequality on schools and children’s life chances.

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